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FAMILY SPONSORSHIP

Let us help you come to Canada thru family sponsorship. Book a consultation today.

The Canadian government recognizes the importance of having your family with you in Canada, and it is with this in mind, they created the Canadian Family Class. The Canadian Family Class allows you to sponsor certain family members to Canada once you have become a permanent resident of Canada or if you are a Canadian citizen. This program is limited to certain immediate family members, including spouses, dependent children, parents, and grandparents. The program does not allow you to sponsor siblings or other relatives to Canada unless they meet specific criteria.

 

In some cases, the Canadian sponsor would have to prove that they could financially support their family member for a specified period for the application to be approved.

Sponsorship applications are a two-part process where the sponsor is assessed to ensure that they meet all of the required criteria to sponsor a family member. Then the family member is evaluated to ensure that they meet all of the program’s criteria and that they are not inadmissible to Canada.

OUR SERVICES

Permanent Resident Package

  • Assessment and consultation.

  • Sponsor application submission.

  • Permanent resident application submission.

Temporary Resident Package

  • Spousal open work permit application

  • Dependent children's temporary resident visa application

  • Super visa application

Do You Qualify?

You may not be able to sponsor a family member to Canada if any of the following apply to you:

  • Be at least 18 years of age;

  • Be a Canadian citizen, or a person registered in Canada as an Indian under the Canadian Indian Act or, a permanent resident of Canada;

  • Be living in Canada unless

    • you are a Canadian citizen who lives abroad and

    • you plan to return to Canada when your relatives immigrate and

    • are sponsoring your:

      • spouse or

      • common-law or conjugal partner or

      • dependent children who have no dependent children

  • meet set income guidelines unless

    • you are sponsoring your spouse or common-law partner, and they do not have a dependent child who has one or more children of their own

    • you are sponsoring your dependent child who does not have any   dependent children of their own

  • Agree in writing to give financial support to your relative and any other eligible relatives coming with them:

    • beginning on the date they become a permanent resident

    • for up to 20 years (varies based on relationship)

You may not be able to sponsor a family member to Canada if any of the following apply to you:

  • You are in prison

  • You have not paid your alimony or child support payments

  • You have declared bankruptcy and have not been released from it yet

  • You receive/received social assistance for reasons other than being disabled

  • You did not pay back an immigration loan, made late payments or missed payments

  • You sponsored another relative in the past and did not meet the terms of the sponsorship agreement

  • You were convicted of a violent crime, any offence against a relative or any sexual offence, depending on details of the case, such as:

    • the type of offence

    • how long ago it was

    • whether a record suspension was issued (formerly called “pardons” in Canada)

Sponsor your spouse or common-law partner

If you are a Canadian citizen or permanent resident, you may be eligible to sponsor your spouse or common-law partner to Canada. If the application is approved, your spouse or common-law partner will obtain Canadian permanent residence.

 

To qualify as common-law partners, you would have to be able to show that you and your partner had been cohabitating for a minimum of twelve months preceding the date of submitting your application.

 

If you are a Canadian permanent resident, you must be living in Canada when applying. Only Canadian citizens can apply to sponsor their spouse or common-law partner while residing outside of Canada. If you are a Canadian citizen who is residing outside of Canada, you need to be able to satisfy an officer that you will live in Canada when the person you want to sponsor becomes a permanent resident.

 

There is no set amount of money that the sponsor needs to have to sponsor their spouse or common-law partner unless you’re sponsoring a spouse or partner with a dependent child, and their dependent child has one or more children of their own.

 

For this type of application, you would need to prove that you are legally married or living together in a conjugal relationship for at least one year.

Those who wish to sponsor their spouse or common-law partner to Canada will be responsible for that family member for three years after arriving in Canada. This means that you will be held accountable if your spouse or common-law partner receives social assistance during the validity period of the undertaking. If your spouse or common-law partner does receive social assistance during the validity period of your undertaking, unless you or your spouse or common-law partner repays the government that has provided the social assistance, you will not be eligible to sponsor any other member of the family class.

Sponsor your dependent children

If you are a Canadian citizen or permanent resident, you may be eligible to sponsor your dependent children to Canada. If the application is approved, your children will obtain Canadian permanent residence.

 

If you are a Canadian permanent resident, you have to be living in Canada when applying. Only Canadian citizens can apply to sponsor their dependent children while residing outside of Canada if you are a Canadian citizen outside of Canada. In that case, you need to satisfy an officer that you will live in Canada when the person you want to sponsor becomes a permanent resident.

 

There is no set amount of money that the sponsor needs to have to sponsor their dependent children unless you’re sponsoring a dependent child that has one or more dependent children of their own.

Those who wish to sponsor their dependent children to Canada will be responsible for that family member for ten years after they arrive in Canada or until they turn 25 years of age. If you sponsored a dependent child 22 years of age or older, your undertaking would be for three years. Children 22 years of age or older can only be considered dependent children if they had depended on their parents for financial support before they reached the age of 22. They can’t financially support themselves due to a mental or physical condition.

 

If you are sponsoring a dependent child to Quebec, your undertaking will be for ten years or until they turn 18 if they were under the age of 16 when you sponsored them, whichever period is longer. If they were over the age of 16, your undertaking would be for three years or until the child turns 25, whichever period is longer.

 

This means that you will be held accountable if your dependent child receives social assistance during the validity period of the undertaking. If your dependent child does receive social assistance during the validity period of your undertaking unless you or your dependent child repays the government that has provided the social assistance. In that case, you will not be eligible to sponsor any other member of the family class.

Sponsor your orphaned brother, sister, nephew, niece or grandchild

Canadian citizens and permanent residents can sponsor their orphaned brother, sister, nephew, niece, or grandchild in certain circumstances. If the application is approved, your relative will obtain Canadian permanent residence. For this type of application, you have to be living in Canada when applying.

 

To qualify to sponsor an orphaned brother, sister, nephew, niece or grandchild, your relative must meet all of the following criteria:

 

  • they’re related to you by blood or adoption

  • both their mother and father have passed away

  • they’re under 18 years of age

  • they’re single (not married or in a common-law or conjugal relationship)

 

You can’t sponsor your orphaned brother, sister, nephew, niece or grandchild if:

 

  • one of their parents is still alive

  • no one knows where their parents are

  • their parents abandoned them

  • someone else other than their parents is taking care of them while one or both their parents are alive

  • their parent is in jail or otherwise, detained

 

Those who wish to sponsor their relative to Canada will be responsible for that family member for ten years after arriving in Canada. This means that you will be held accountable if your relative receives social assistance during the validity period of the undertaking. If your relative does receive social assistance during the validity period of your undertaking unless you or your relative repays the government that has provided the social assistance. In that case, you will not be eligible to sponsor any other member of the family class.

 

As part of this application, the sponsor will need to provide Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada with documents that show their financial resources for the past 12 months and prove they can financially sponsor their family member and meet the Low Income Cut-Off (LICO). The Low-Income Cut-Off (LICO) is based on the total number of persons the sponsor would be responsible for. For “total number of persons you would be responsible for,” this needs to include:

 

  • yourself

  • your spouse or common-law partner, if applicable

  • your dependent children

  • your spouse’s or common-law partner’s dependent children

  • any other person you and your co-signer may have sponsored in the past for whom you are still financially responsible for

  • the number of parents and grandparents you want to sponsor

  • the spouse or common-law partner of the parents and grandparents you want to sponsor, if applicable

  • the dependent children of the parents and grandparents you want to sponsor, if applicable

Sponsor your other relatives

In certain circumstances, Canadian citizens and permanent residents can sponsor other relatives to Canada. If the application is approved, your relative will obtain Canadian permanent residence. For this type of application, you must be living in Canada when applying.

 

Canadian citizens and permanent residents may sponsor one relative of any age to Canada if their relative is related to them by blood or adoption and they (the sponsor) meet all of the following conditions:

 

  • you (the person who wants to sponsor your relative) do not have a living relative you could sponsor instead, such as a:

    •     spouse

    •     common-law partner

    •     conjugal partner

    •     son or daughter

    •     parent

    •     grandparent

    •     orphaned brother or sister

    •     orphaned nephew or niece

    •     orphaned grandchild

  • you (the potential sponsor) don’t have any relatives (aunt or uncle or any of the relatives listed above), who is a:

    •     Canadian citizen

    •     permanent resident

    •     registered Indian under the Indian Act

 

As part of this application, the sponsor will need to provide Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada with documents that show their financial resources for the past 12 months and prove they can financially sponsor their family member and meet the Low Income Cut-Off (LICO). The Low-Income Cut-Off (LICO) is based on the total number of persons the sponsor would be responsible for. For “total number of persons you would be responsible for,” this needs to include:

 

  • yourself

  • your spouse or common-law partner, if applicable

  • your dependent children

  • your spouse’s or common-law partner’s dependent children

  • any other person you and your co-signer may have sponsored in the past for whom you are still financially responsible for

  • the number of parents and grandparents you want to sponsor

  • the spouse or common-law partner of the parents and grandparents you want to sponsor, if applicable

  • the dependent children of the parents and grandparents you want to sponsor, if applicable

The current Low-Income Cut-Off (LICO) is as follows:

WHAT'S NEXT?

Take Our Free Assessment

Complete our free assessment here to have our Regulated Canadian Immigration Consultant evaluate whether you would be eligible to immigrate to Canada at this time.

Book A Full Consultation

To review your eligibility and all of your available Canadian immigration options directly with our Regulated Canadian Immigration Consultant, book a full consultation right now.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

  • What kind of service do you provide?
    The Labour Market Impact Assessment Work Permit Extension on the Work Permit Permanent Residence Status in Canada Relocation Assistance (S.I.N., Banking, temporary accommodation, Health Care and ESL, etc.)
  • What positions do you recruit for?
    We provide placement services primarily in the Construction, Trucking, Welding, Manufacturing, and Service Industries. Our primary focus is to assist your organization by matching you with the right employees based on your specific needs. We do this while building partnerships based on mutual respect, trust, and professionalism.
  • What countries do you recruit from?
    We recruit from any country worldwide but specialize in select countries due to the availability of high and low skilled workers and the success rate of the immigration process per country. We specialize in recruiting from the Philippines, Dubai, Saudi Arabia, Taiwan, Macao and Singapore.
  • What is the difference between low-skill and high-skill workers?
    The National Occupational Classification or NOC defines the difference between low and high skilled workers for short. The National Occupational Classification (NOC) is the nationally accepted reference on occupations in Canada. Each occupation has a designated NOC code based on the skill requirements required to perform the job. High-skilled workers are designated under skill levels 0, A, or B of the National Occupational Classification Matrix. Low-skilled positions are designated as skill levels C and D of the matrix. For further information, please refer to the matrix here.
  • Can a foreign worker work for someone else?
    Foreign workers who immigrate to Canada on a temporary work visa cannot work for any other employer unless authorized to do so. To obtain authorization to work for another employer is a painstaking process. In most cases, an employee will not try to switch employers as long as they are treated fairly and the employment contract terms are met.
  • What are my obligations as an employer?
    As an employer, you are obligated to treat foreign workers the same as treating Canadian workers. A contract between the foreign worker and the potential employer is signed before the foreign worker is granted their work permit. This contract outlines the obligations made between the employer and the employee. If the foreign worker does not meet the criteria set forth by the employer for their employees, the employer is under no obligation to keep them and can terminate their contract.
  • How long does the process take?
    The length of the process depends on the position the company is recruiting for and the country they wish to recruit from. The shortest time frame to have a foreign worker in Canada is approximately one month. The waiting times to acquire a foreign worker from beginning to end range from approximately 3-7 months.
  • How much do I have to pay for wages?
    Service Canada requirements dictate that you must pay the "Median Wage." As the Median Wage changes regularly and varies by occupation and is further determined by geographical location, we ask that you please get in touch with us for the current salary in your area for a specific occupation.
  • Do I have to deduct CPP, EI and employment tax from the foreign worker?"
    Employers are responsible for deducting the same taxes as they would from their Canadian employees.
  • Do I have to provide accommodation to the foreign worker?
    We can assist your company in finding accommodation for your foreign employees for a small fee, or you can choose to help the workers secure their accommodations. The employer must ensure that the employee's accommodations are no greater than 33% of the employee's gross wage for low-skilled workers. Temporary foreign workers usually choose to share accommodations to lower the cost of living.
  • How much do your services cost?
    Our company has several packages available to suit your needs.
  • Do I need to sign a contract?
    You will be required to sign a contract for either a one or two-year period. However, if for some reason you no longer need the worker, you may terminate the contract provided that it is done in accordance with the provincial labour laws in your province.
  • How long can I employ a Foreign Worker?
    There are currently no restrictions on the length of employment. As long as both the employer and the employee meet the Temporary Foreign Worker Program requirements, they may renew indefinitely.
  • Aside from wages, are there other costs associated with getting a Foreign Worker?"
    If you are hiring a lower-skill worker, you will be responsible for purchasing a return flight for the worker as an employer. If you are hiring a skilled worker, you are not required to pay the flight costs.
  • Can I hire a part-time Temporary Foreign worker?
    All positions must be full-time. However, the number of hours that qualify as full-time varies significantly from province to province. It can be as little as 30 hours per week, depending on which province the Foreign Worker is employed in. There are some exceptions, such as a Temporary Foreign Worker holding an open work permit or a study permit.
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